Romanians in the UK: the less visible side of the debate

This report summarises the findings and themes from Alexandra Bulat’s (Sociology, University of Cambridge) MPhil dissertation, “Double standards?: Romanians’ attitudes towards the British, co-nationals and other minorities in the UK”, submitted June 2016. All participants’ names have been changed to respect their anonymity. This exploratory qualitative study draws mainly on the views and experiences of 45 Romanian citizens living in the UK. The analysis is based on 56 recorded interviews, 36 being conducted solely for the MPhil and 20 for YMOBILITY.

Za’atari Refugee Camp: Life in the Desert

While the concept of the refugee camp has been criticized as a device to merely keep refugees alive, Za’atari’s organizations offer many programs to empower and educate residents—Katrine, a 16-year-old divorcee who advocates for girls to finish education before marriage; Miriam, a 19-year-old photojournalist-to-be who interviews others in the camp; and Abu Yaqub, a 50-year-old security guard who makes sure all thirteen of his children go to school

Syrian resilience is real, and for many right now, the only hope. These are the communities who can rebuild their country upon return or bring ingenuity to new places upon resettlement. In the meantime, organizations should acknowledge the semi-permanence of the “forever temporary” situation and continue their committed presence in residents’ lives. As long as Za’atari is dismissed as merely a refugee camp, all of its residents’ potential will be just that: potential.